Sarah Silverman — Stop Telling Girls They Can Be Anything They Want

 

While I was listening to Hi! Bob on Audible, one of the scenes involved Sarah Silverman and Bob Newhart discussing stand up comedy. The clip in the chapter comes from Silverman’s set entitled, “We Are Miracles” and discusses the impact of priming on young women. Telling people they can be anything they want can possible introduce issues they maybe never thought were issues before. How we talk to young women often plays a role in future human capital acquisition and may lead to a form of subtle human capital discrimination.

Hard Knocks — Carl Nassib Teaches Compound Interest

 

Athletes are notoriously bad at saving money and making smart financial decisions after coming into their fortunes. Carl Nassib, a defensive lineman with the Cleveland Browns, discusses the power of compound interest with other rookies. His goal is to convince his teammates not to go out and spend $10,000 on a needless purchase because that means they are giving up a lot more money later in life. While 10% may be an unlikely interest rate, the power of compounding interest is one of the key principles in financial literacy programs.

Curb Your Enthusiasm — Anonymous Donations

 

 

Larry David makes a large donation to the National Resources Defense Council, a non-profit environmental advocacy group, but Larry is quickly upstaged by an anonymous donation that he finds out is made by Ted Danson. Larry felt like he was doing a great thing by donating to the fund, but felt it was a truly altruistic donation. He believes the anonymous donation by Ted Danson is a better deal because anonymous donors get more recognition for appearing to not care about the recognition, even though they go around telling people they were the anonymous donor.

Thanks to Nautilus and Moblab for the clip suggestions:

 

Mad Men — Lucky Strike Pitch

The team at Sterling Cooper Advertising Agency has to come up with a new way to sell cigarettes because the government has limited what companies can say about their products. The government has put a ban on advertising such that firms can’t say that their product is healthy. Instead, the men of Sterling Cooper talk about product differentiation and how to make Lucky Strike look special even though it’s the same product.

Chris Rock: Bullet Control

 

Guns and bullets are complement goods. This clip from Chris Rock’s HBO comedy special talks about how making the price of bullets $5000 would limit the amount of shootings. This is essentially talking about how when the price of a product increases, the demand for complement goods related to that product decreases. By having the price of a bullet cost $5000, Chris is basically saying that the government should put a price floor on bullets. This will result in less people being able to afford bullets and possible a black market for bullets. All of which are addressed in this clip. This clip has been edited for class use.

H/T to James Tierney

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