Los Angeles Clippers — Dynamic & Variable Pricing

The LA Clippers explain the difference between variable and dynamic ticket pricing, which are often confused by fans. Variable pricing refers to changes in ticket prices based on factors like opponent, day of the week, or time of the game. Dynamic ticket pricing takes things a step further and actually bases the ticket price off demand and supply for a particular game.

Northwestern — Purple Pricing Plan

Northwestern University unveiled one of the first dynamic pricing models for college sports in 2014. Students can reserve seats for upcoming sporting events and if prices fall to lower prices because of low demand, anyone who paid higher prices would be refunded. This incentive was meant to encourage students to reserve their seats early for big games. The two also introduce a Dutch Auction for tickets where students can set their reserve price and if they fall within the window then they’ll be assigned tickets.

Always Sunny — Surrogacy Savings

Dee offers her womb to become a surrogate for a couple. In order to try and get a higher payoff, she offers  to have more children at a discount for the couple. She notes that savings really kicks in if the couple were to have multiple children at one time. She even offers to be an octo-mom. This could also serve as a fun example of second degree price discrimination.

Always Sunny: One Rock

Dennis and Dee are trying to buy a crack rock in order to manipulate the welfare system, but they aren’t really sure of the cost of a crack rock. When they approach a street dealer, he quickly realizes that the two clients aren’t well informed and he can earn a bit of extra profit by charging them a higher price. Luckily for him, they agree.

Shameless — Hipsters in a Bar

In this clip you see a bar that’s on the South Side of Chicago. The bar is usually dead but very recently “hipsters” discovered the bar. They thought that the snide Russian bartender and expensive drinks made the place different and appealing to them.¬†This bar serves cheap low end alcohol and in the video you can see price discrimination happening. The prices start to change and become higher when the bar serves the hipsters because they are able to pay those high prices versus the people from south side that can’t. The hipsters are also not realizing they are being scammed when the low end vodka is put in a more expensive brand’s bottle.

Thanks for the clip and summary Fiona Brandman!

Adam Ruins Everything — Eyeglass Monopoly

Adam Ruins Everything is a half-hour informational comedy were host, Adam Conover, debunks popular myths. Each episode is divided into 3 segments with some common theme. In the Spring of 2018, James Tierney and I sat down to go through all three seasons of Adam Ruins Everything to pick out examples in each episode that could be used in an economics course. If you’re curious about the paper, you can read about it here.

Eyeglasses in the United States can cost hundreds of dollars and that’s probably because 80% of glasses are manufactured by one firm under different brand names. Because they produce both luxury and basic brands, they are able to raise prices well beyond a more competitive price. Luxottica even owns many of the sunglasses stores, which gives them buying power over inputs.

Senator Alesi — Zone Pricing for Gasoline

Senator Alesi discusses a practice known as zone pricing whereas oil companies charge different prices to gasoline station owners depending on how affluent the surrounding area is. This leads to differing gas prices for citizens across the city.

Paper Moon — Selling Bibles

The young girl performs the role of price determinator in this clip from Paper Moon. The bibles hypothetically cannot be resold because they are inscribed with a name of the deceased. The girl looks around the living room to determine the price that the consumers would be willing (and able) to pay for the bible.

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